Talk:Irish Wolfhound

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
WikiProject Dogs (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject iconThis article is within the scope of WikiProject Dogs, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of articles related to Canidae and commonly referred to as "dogs" and of which the domestic dog is but one of its many members, on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Dogs To-do:
Here are some tasks you can do to help with WikiProject Dogs:
WikiProject Ireland (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject iconThis article is within the scope of WikiProject Ireland, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Ireland on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

User:MiszaBot/conf

Freelance Police[edit]

Sam of the Sam & Max series is based off the Irish Wolfhound. Don't know if it belongs in the article, just sayin'

Signed and dated for archive purposes only. William Harris • (talk) • 09:56, 30 April 2019 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Temperament follies[edit]

This portion is confusing. Does this double negative imply that they are favored for loyalty? The section below needs a re-write.

Irish wolfhounds are often not favored for their lack of loyalty, affection, patience and devotion. At some points in history they have been used as watchdogs, unlike some breeds, the Irish wolfhound is usually reliable in this role as they are often not friendly toward strangers, their size can be a natural deterrent. That said, when protection is required this dog is never found wanting. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.88.50.223 (talk) 05:24, 23 July 2011 (UTC)Reply[reply]

That was vandalism -- I've fixed it. Anna talk 06:44, 23 July 2011 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Possibly over enthusiastic use of "citation needed"[edit]

At the end of the first paragraph of the "Pre-19th Century" portion of the "History" section of this article, there is a reference given for The New Complete Irish Wolfhound by Joel Samaha. Despite this fact, there is a notation of "citation needed" in every single sentence of this paragraph.

Has it been determined that the information presented in this paragraph is not contained in the book referenced? Or was the person inserting the repeated requests for citations positing doubt as to the credibility of the reference itself? If it is the latter, a single notation regarding the reliability of the source should suffice. Lunarmovements (talk) 17:48, 25 September 2012 (UTC)Reply[reply]

"Pre-19th century Ancient wood cuts[citation needed]" There are no "ancient" woodcuts of the Irish Wolfhound in its present form. I suspect this is reference to the woodcuts of the Gardner's volume "The Irish Wolfhound" first publication date 1931.

There is no proof provided of "writings have placed them in existence as a breed by 273 BC."

There is no proof provided of "indication[citation needed] that they existed even as early as 600 BC when the Tectosages and Tolistobogii Celts sacked Delphi."

There is no proof provided of "Survivors left accounts[citation needed] of the fierce Celts and the huge dogs who fought with them and at their side. They were mentioned by Julius Caesar[citation needed] in his treatise, The Gallic Wars,"

To those whom it may concern: if there is any, please provide reliable and verifiable proof that these dogs were actually mentioned, and that they are the same as the modern "breed", so that mythology is no longer propagated on this page, either by hearsay or by reference to poorly or inaccurately researched printed works. --Richard Hawkins (talk) 23:09, 27 September 2012 (UTC)Reply[reply]

American Kennel Club???[edit]

Why is this article using the American Kennel Club as a point of reference? Why not the standard of the country of origin, which is also the internationally-recognised FCI standard?109.255.138.92 (talk) 23:04, 28 September 2013 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Anyone know which McBryde book is being referenced?[edit]

The Magnificent Irish Wolfhound or The Irish Wolfhound Guide by Mary McBryde both seem to be 1998 books. I presume it is at least one of these books that is being cited. Antiqueight discuss 00:00, 5 October 2013 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Never mind - I missed it on the page : McBryde, Mary (1998). The Irish Wolfhound: Symbol of Celtic Splendor. John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 978-0-87605-169-6.Antiqueight discuss 00:00, 5 October 2013 (UTC)Reply[reply]